Archive 3 March 2020

René Caudron passed away

Originally from Belgium near Mons, René Caudron did most of his studies there, before joining Onera in 1964 where he was part of the small group that, around Paul Costa, set up the ONERA Solid State Physics Laboratory created at the initiative of Raimond Castaing. He spent his entire career at ONERA in the Materials Department and then at the LEM. He was one of the essential members of the laboratory, an extraordinary engineer-physicist, originally by many aspects of its national and international reputation.
At a time when almost all experiments were set up “at home”, René participated in all the research “manips” of LEM during the first twenty-five years of its existence, which were devoted to the study of the electronic structure of transition compounds: carbides, nitrides, hydrides, borides. These were low-temperature experiments, the highlight of which was undoubtedly its specific low-temperature heat measuring device, one of the most efficient at the time. He thus contributed to validating the models developed at Orsay and Strasbourg on diluted alloys. This was his thesis work.
He took part in all the experimental studies of the laboratory, specialising for a long period in the study of spin glasses, before moving on to the study of chemical effects in alloys. On this occasion, he built his famous G4.4 diffuse scattering spectrometer, installed on the CEA’s Orphée nuclear reactor in Saclay, which he was in charge of until his retirement in 2003, and which was also among the most efficient in the world.
An outstanding physicist and experimentalist, René Caudron made a deep impression on his colleagues, interns and doctoral students, all of whom testify to having met in him an extraordinary researcher and, above all, a man of conviction of unspeakable kindness and modesty.

 

CPFEM simulations of grain size effect in FCC polycrystals: a new approach based on surface GND density

A multiscale modeling methodology involving discrete dislocation dynamics (DDD) and crystal plasticity finite element method (CPFEM) is used to study the physical origin and to simulate the grain size effect in FCC polycrystalline plasticity. This model is based on the dislocation density storage–recovery framework, expanded on the scale of slip systems. DDD simulations are used to establish a constitutive law incorporating the main dislocation mechanisms controlling strain hardening in monotonically deformed FCC polycrystals. This is achieved by calculating key quantities controlling the accumulation of the forest dislocation density within the grains and the polarized dislocation density at the grain boundaries during plastic deformation. The model is then integrated into the CPFEM at the polycrystalline aggregate scale to compute short- and long-range internal stresses within the grains. These simulations quantitatively reproduce the deformation curves of FCC polycrystals as a function of grain size. Because of its predictive ability to reproduce the Hall-Petch law, the proposed framework has a great potential for further applications.

Speaker: Maoyuan Jiang

Date and Location: Monday 09/03/20 14h00, LEM meeting room (E2.01.20), Châtillon.

Orientation imaging at the onset of plastic deformation


Diffraction Contrast Tomography (DCT) is a near-field X-ray diffraction technique for the inspection of ductile materials at the micron scale. It has traditionally been used for the study of undeformed polycrystalline materials with grain sizes of a few tenths of microns. It uses a box-sized monochromatic X-ray beam, which allows it to scan large regions of millimeter sized sample (with up to thousands of grains) in a relatively short time.
Recent work has introduced sub-grain orientation reconstruction (6D-DCT), which has made DCT a viable tool for the reconstruction of slightly deformed materials.
Topo-tomography (TT) is also a near-field X-ray diffraction technique, which, on the other hand, allows to focus on a single grain with a high-resolution detector and to obtain sub-micron level shape information.
In this talk, we will first present how the data is acquired and reconstructed in modern DCT and TT acquisitions. Then, we will present their 6D and 5D extensions (respectively) for the reconstruction of sub-grain level orientation information. Finally, we will discuss future applications, including the combined use of DCT and TT data in a single 6D reconstruction for the investigation of slip bands formation at the onset of deformation.

Speaker: Dr Nicola Viganò

Date and Location: Friday 21/02/20, 14h00 LEM meeting room (E2.01.20), Châtillon.